Modest home price growth forecasted for 2019

Home prices across the country are expected to rise in 2019, but only at a moderate pace compared with recent years, according to two of Canada’s largest residential real estate brokerages.

Royal LePage is anticipating the national median home price will increase by 1.2 per cent in 2019, with prices in Toronto and the surrounding areas expected to rise 1.3 per cent to $854,552.

Prices in Toronto and the surrounding areas are expected to rise 1.3 per cent, while homes in Greater Vancouver are forecast to increase by just 0.6 per cent according to the annual outlook by Royal LePage.
Prices in Toronto and the surrounding areas are expected to rise 1.3 per cent, while homes in Greater Vancouver are forecast to increase by just 0.6 per cent according to the annual outlook by Royal LePage.  (GRAEME ROY / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILE PHOTO)

Home prices in Greater Vancouver are forecast to go up by just 0.6 per cent to $1.29 million, while home prices in Montreal and the nearby region are expected to see the largest rise out of Canada’s biggest cities, with home prices anticipated to jump three per cent to $421,306 in 2019.

Royal LePage CEO Phil Soper said the national housing market is expected to remain in a “correctional cycle” that began this year, with home prices appreciating at a “snail’s pace.”

“Markets aren’t perfect. They overshoot and then they must correct,” he said in a statement.

The Royal LePage report blamed the “tepid pace” of price growth on a number of factors including rising interest rates, global trade risks and the low price of Canadian crude.

It noted that would-be buyers who had for years been shut out of hot markets in Toronto and Vancouver may have a bigger opportunity to purchase in 2019. It says it expects a jump in sales activity come spring.

Meanwhile, in a separate report Tuesday, Re/Max said it expects average home sale prices to go up by 1.7 per cent in the new year.

It also anticipates housing markets across the country will stabilize as Canadians feel a bigger impact from higher interest rates.

“Demand isn’t as strong as it was in the past but it is still very, very strong,” said Christopher Alexander, executive vice-president and regional director of Re/Max of Ontario-Atlantic Canada.

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